13 borrowed words in Russian

with 2 Comments

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A recent article by the genius Michele A. Berdy, Beware The ‘Goochi’ Bag in Moscow, got me thinking about other borrowed words I’d encountered in Russian (in some of these cases, though, it’s almost more of a hijacking than a borrowing).

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Remember the “e-mail or email” debate of the late 90s? Now Russian is dealing with the “уик-енд” ….
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… “или уикенд” stickler ; )

 

The words and phrases below have been collected from conversations with friends, proofreading assignments, and random internet browsing. Can you understand them all?

  1. On a life coach’s website: тренер, спикер, коуч
  2. In a job ad: послать резюме на мейл, знание: уровня мидл
  3. Наш клиент стартует новый проект.
  4. On women.ru: выбрать юзерпик
  5. Ну что, ты пофиксил?
  6. ноу-хау
  7. лайфхак
  8. её аутфиты
  9. Я юзаю Internet Explorer.
  10. Кликайте на иконку.
  11. конференция по HR-брендингу
  12. Меня заблокировали за читерство.
  13. эссаймент-менеджер

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Do you think the appearance of so many English words in Russian motivates Russian speakers to study English? Could it make learning English easier? Do you think Russia will ever take action against foreign words like France has done? Do you have another word to add to the list? Leave a comment below!

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2 Responses

  1. Roman
    | Reply

    “Do you think the appearance of so many English words in Russian motivates Russian speakers to study English? Could it make learning English easier?”
    Recalling myself studying English, the excessive use of loanwords just slightly pushed me to know their meaning; the thing is that each loanword is usually taken in some very narrow context, like “scope” for IT. Therefore, one needs to learn a particular loanword narrow usage and simplified pronunciation in Russian, and its broader context and proper spelling in English.

    Bottomline: such straightforward loanwords speed up acquiring and spreading of new ideas, but later add some duplication for language learning.

    “Do you think Russia will ever take action against foreign words like France has done?”
    It’s quite probable to happen, since more and more people are getting hit with futuroshock, and this is a good and plausible way to have a long-term payed job for dozens of people 🙂
    Though even if this won’t happen, Russian language is unlikely to be harmed – all languages consist of loanwords a bit more than 100% )

    IMHO.

    • Katherine
      | Reply

      Good points, Roman! : ) And “this is a good and plausible way to have a long-term paid job for dozens of people” reminds me of a conversation we had in class once about Ukraine’s food-labeling laws.

      PS: Have you ever looked into words that English grabbed up from other languages? Wikipedia entry @ http://goo.gl/kfGIxX I liked ‘avatar’ (Sanskrit), karaoke (Japanese), and boss (Dutch).

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