Restaurants 1

with 12 Comments

Sushiya

 

One thing we did often in Ukraine was try out different restaurants. The final count stood at over 60 restaurants! (Full list here.) After all that, I’ve got to say that Ukraine has AMAZING food- how can anyone refuse something like this??

vareniky

 

It’s totally impossible to resist, I swear. One bite and you’re already ordering a second plate to take home and snack on.

 

But you’ll have to wait just a little longer, since in this particular Street Russian Project we’re not going inside the restaurants… yet. We’re going to stay on the street for now.

 

Can you read the names of these restaurants?

Baskin_Robbins

Mustafa_cafe_theater

souphouse

Russian_restaurant_names2

 

Or how about these places named after famous people (or famous types of people)?

Ukraine_restaurants

Pirate_Hut_Ukraine

 

And sometimes you’ll get a freebie like these- it must sound cool to give your business an English name 😉

Kharkiv_restaurants

 

If you want a напиток and something to перекусить, you could head to one of these places-

coffee_shop

 

or perhaps just straight to the-

 

bar

 

My favorite place, though, is any cafe that serves these с 12.00 до 16.00:

business_lunches
Click on the picture above to read about our business lunch adventures in Ukraine!

Kharkov_cafe_bar_maybe_menu

Russian_tasty_lunches

 

Runner-up for favorite place to eat would be a little place like this (if only it were open)-

Kharkov_chebureki_stand

 

If you’re getting snacky, grab something to tide you over and check the blog again soon for Restaurants 2. 🙂 Пока for now!

Ukraine_food_mural

 

Russian / English cheat sheet

вкусно, быстро, доступно = tasty, quick, affordable

нахлебник = The strangest name for a restaurant ever or what? А нахлебник = a freeloader. Maybe this is a play on хлебник (baker)- what do you think?

факел = torch

Выпей! Закуси! Развлекись! = Drink! Snack! Be entertained!

бокал пива в подарок к любой пицце = free glass of beer with any pizza

кофейня = coffee shop

Приглашаем вкусно покушать = we invite you to eat tasty food

избавляем от хлопот и предлегаем выбрать вкусную и полезную еду = we eliminate the hassle and invite you to choose tasty and healthy food

 

Russian_Stage_3_McDonalds

 

Street Russian Project index

Drinks

Housing

Holidays

Job Vocab #1

Staying Healthy

Sweets and Snacks

12 Responses

  1. Valentina
    | Reply

    нахлебник = a freeloader – правильно. Слова хлебник в русском языке не существует. Думаю, что корни названия нахлебник для кафе, нужно искать в других славянских языках, т.е. возможно, что значение слова нахлебник в другом славянском языке будет подходить к названию кафе. Например, многие слова в болгарском языке похожи на русский, но имеют совершенно другое значение: по-болгарски направо в переводе на русский означает прямо, но никак не направо. 🙂 http://www.bglife.ru/entries/2112/

    • Katherine
      | Reply

      Спасибо за информацию, Валентина! That’s what I get for Google translating хлебник, oops :p Было интересно прочитать этот список.

      • Valentina
        |

        Есть еще устаревшее значение слова нахлебник: получающий за плату стол и помещение в чужой семье. В современном русском языке мы не употребляем слово нахлебник с этим значением, но, возможно, в Украине слово нахлебник используется в этом значении.

      • Katherine
        |

        Даже мой муж не знал об этом! Удивительно, что значение так поменялось. (boarder to freeloader)

      • Valentina
        |

        Я тоже не знала. Нашла эту информацию в словаре http://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/ushakov/878470

  2. Ruth Elisabeth
    | Reply

    Funnily enough I’ve been learning Bulgarian Cyrillic, so I got the first one – Baskin Robbins, right? And, well, bar!

    • Katherine
      | Reply

      Right, Thảo! 🙂 And you can probably get the суп-хаус one too (хаус is super-popular in restaurant names these days). How exciting that you’re taking on Bulgarian now!! What prompted this new adventure? And did you see the link that Valentina posted above of Russian vs Bulgarian words?

      • Ruth Elisabeth
        |

        Soup house? I’ll look out for that in Bulgaria (that’s the reason for the change ;)). It’s exciting (though also a bit intimidating) to dive into a new language family!

      • Katherine
        |

        That is AWESOME, Ruth Elisabeth. So, so awesome! Hope to hear more about what it’s like for you there. I’m trying to convince my husband to go somewhere that ends in -a (Bulgaria, Moldova, Russia, Slovakia, etc) but no luck yet :p

        They say once you’ve “learned how to learn”, picking up the next foreign language is easier. Hopefully some of the things that helped you stick with Vietnamese will also come in handy with Bulgarian.

      • Ruth Elisabeth
        |

        Eastern Europe is certainly an adventure! I use instagram but I might even dust off my old tumblr as Bulgaria doesn’t really fit in with ‘More Vietnamese’.

      • Katherine
        |

        I just looked up your instagram (via your blog). You totally have the market cornered on Vietnamese-Bulgarian learning!!! 😉 It’s cool how you’re combining the 2 languages- if you decide to continue like that, it could be your “unique selling proposition”.

        I don’t have an IG account but if that happens, I’m definitely, definitely following you.

      • Ruth Elisabeth
        |

        Actually I’ve been wondering whether to keep a separate IG account for the blog and one for me and my life because there is no market for Vietnamese-Bulgarian. My USP is already Vietnamese (no other active non-native speaker blogs specialising in this). I did kinda wonder about dusting off my old tumlbr to create some kind of documentation of my time here. Crossposting relevant pics from IG as well as writing random things I observe without being a full blown blog.

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