Russian Roundup- September 2016

with 7 Comments

Happy end-of-September! 🙂

october_meme

This month I worked on two consistent habits in the name of Russian studies.

The first: speaking Russian every day with my husband. Most days it’s a tiny interaction, but once we kept up a conversation while walking for about 45 minutes.

The second (and I know this is so silly): have you ever noticed how Russian speakers say up-chee when they sneeze? I have allergies, so I decided to switch my sneezes to Russian instead of the usual ah-choo. D laughs and laughs when I manage to do it. Still feels weird, though. Have you ever tried to чихать по-русски? (Don’t even get me started on Как чихают животные.)

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To the сводка новостей! (That was one of my new words this month- it means news roundup. This is the seventeenth monthly Russian roundup and I only just learned the word, haha.)

 

Read these-

 

Watch these-

Funny:

Русский язык в американских фильмах. Whenever someone speaks Russian in a movie, my mom always asks me “Did s/he say it right?” In most of these movie clips- нет.

 

Interesting:

Philochko on Russian news. If you haven’t found Philochko on YouTube yet, he was an American English teacher living in / traveling through Russia who attracted a lot of attention for his videos. (He’s still in Russia but has since dropped teaching and calls himself a “phat ass white girl modal manager”.)

 

Educational:

Anastasia Semina has a collection of conversational Russian vlogs, including recent interviews with a travel blogger, Italian chef, and a podcaster.

 

Back to Basics:

When your brain is fried and needs a break, try a couple of these videos for babies. There are 53 videos in total, covering simple things like colors, dog breeds, and furniture.

 

 

 

Also, on a more personal note, this month I wrote about speaking Russian in Portland, Oregon and shared pics of my newest matryoshka gear. What’s been happening in your life and language studies this month?

Happy October! 😀

7 Responses

  1. Valentina
    | Reply

    Я не знала, что русские чихают по-другому. 🙂

    • Katherine
      | Reply

      Странный факт, да? 😉

  2. Jasilyn
    | Reply

    I never noticed the thing about sneezing! I’m totally going to pay attention now! Anton always makes fun of the way I laugh though. He says I laugh with soft sounds.

    • Katherine
      | Reply

      I never paid attention to the smallpox scar thing until you mentioned it…. and I looked and D has one too! How come I never noticed it all this time?! He was like, “Yeah, so what? Everyone has one.”

      A soft sound like a ь? That’s kinda cool!

  3. J.T.
    | Reply

    Wow! I enjoyed reading that piece on Black travellers in Russia. It’s almost like you *magically* picked it out just for me, for it was only yesterday that I was asking the head of my RUS department about the very same subject. Какое совпадение!

    • Katherine
      | Reply

      Funny indeed, wow! What did your department head say, J.T.?

      • J.T.
        |

        She remarked that in the 30+yrs our study abroad program has existed, there have been no serious instances of racism reported by black students who participated. However, she did add that outside of college-sanctioned abroad programs, information on racism toward black travellers in Russia was mixed: interracial couples walking on the streets of Krasnodar and Piter without problems in some cases, and discrimination against darker-skinned visitors in others. Experiences vary greatly.

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